Wednesday, January 20, 2010

There's promise here

I can be a rather lazy winter gardener, opting to stay inside with garden books and magazines instead of doing that tedious side work - raking leaves and pulling any stray weeds - that I know would make spring preparation so much easier. It is for that reason that a late winter stroll through the garden stirs a mix of anticipation and loathing. Although I spy early crocus or the beginnings of Hyacinth bulbs that will eventually perfume the air with their sweet scent, it's all that promise that highlights the drab ravages of winter that have dominated the garden for several months. Now is when I must dig deep, sometimes literally, and find the signs of life the garden still holds.


Brussels sprouts overwintered and have become quite monstrous. I'm embarrassed to admit I haven't been very diligent (again, lazy winter gardener) in harvesting these miniature leafy buds. They're a great source of vitamins A and C, as well as folic acid.

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' is already crowning. These tiny florettes heave up around dry stalks of the previous year's growth. By leaving the plant through the winter, I maintain a bit of sculptural beauty in the garden and again escape some of my duties. I'll likely remove the dried sticks in a couple weeks, or when they're just too raggedy to look at anymore.

The vegetable garden has a few more tasty winter treats that I have overlooked. I believe the plant on the left is mustard, but don't hold me to it. These greens are planted among a cover crop mix of field peas, crimson and dutch clover, rye and common vetch. There's also some garlic 'Crystal White' plunked in this bed. of

Japanese Cedar turns a rusty color in the winter, which at first had me in a panic that I had killed it. It's normally a bluish green evergreen that supposedly is a fast grower. I haven't seen signs of a growth spurt as of yet.

The naked truth of winter gardening. And this was AFTER I cleaned up this bulb bed. Here is where I must turn to summer photos to remind me of all this little spot has to offer!

14 comments:

Karen said...

Well, having a bit of a rest is okay too, don't you think? If I had to take care of the garden every day, year-round, I would probably just give up! We are supposed to be lazy in winter, I think. :) Thanks for the reminder of summer, with all of those fiery bright colors!

The Fern and Mossery said...

I am in the same boat re. being too lazy too garden in winter. And those damn weeds are having the time of their life with all this rain!

Catherine@AGardenerinProgress said...

It's hard to get motivated when it's so rainy and mushy outside, but those signs of new growth are great motivators. I bet the sun today got you outside for a bit! :)

Peggy said...

Such a profuse cheerful colors in a small space in your last picture. Truly something to look forward to during winter's drab days!

Sunny said...

Wow beautiful pictures...I'm glad I found your blog!

Valerie Neal said...

Thank you for following my blog!!! I will be back to read yours when I am on my laptop, not my phone.

Bonnie Story said...

Hi! Great to hear from you and I hope that this finds you well and happy. I too have been exploring pictures from spring and summer of last year for inspiration. I'm excited to see my Rozanne geraniums especially, I divided them all over the place. My sedum is also peeking up - wow! I have left the old stems too long but the Crocosma is so, so raggedy and dead that I'll just have to go clea that up and I'll hit the sedum while I'm out there snipping and sweeping. I sure hope to met you this year at a Sagbutt event - now that we aren't trying to finish our house I should be able to get outta here more often! Thanks so much for stopping by my blog. Have a great day. Bonnie

Gatsbys Gardens said...

I am so jealous that you have plants peeking out and even some flowers.

I grew brussel sprouts once, delicious for Thanksgiving. We were picking them off the stalks the day before.

Kelly said...

Oh my, that summer bed is GORGEOUS!!!

DirtDigger (Tessa) said...

I'm anxious myself to see new growth, especially since I've moved to totally different growing climate! I'm not going to do much, but watch what comes up and plan how to go about things here- what an adventure!

Ginger said...

What a beautifully written post!

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